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Justin Wright

Weekly Recap - Environment is Everything

publishedabout 1 month ago
3 min read

Happy Monday!

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This week we're talking about how to improve your environment and, in turn, improve your results.

As a brief disclaimer: any links for items, books, etc. that are available for purchase are done through affiliate links, which means I may get paid a small pittance of money for anything you buy using these links.


Environment is Everything

The nature vs nurture debate is one that has carried on for generations. In short, do our genetics or our environment determine the type of person we become? Is our destiny predetermined, or can we alter the course of our life by changing the inputs that go into it?

This concept is closely related to the growth vs fixed mindset discussion: those who believe in a growth mindset feel as if we can alter our abilities through practice and repetition. For those who believe in a fixed mindset, they feel that we have natural abilities we gain at birth, and nothing we do in life can alter or change these abilities.

One thing I've observed often in this life is people from humble beginnings who rise above and become successful. I have also seen the inverse: people with every advantage who can't seem to make anything happen. There is more evidence than not to suggest that a growth mindset is possible and, furthermore, that our environment plays a key role in our long-term trajectory as human beings.

If you find yourself making slow progress (or no progress), not improving, stagnating, feeling bored or unmotivated, look at the people you surround yourself with on a regular basis. What are their personalities like? Are they driven? Motivated? Do they give you honest opinions, or are they "yes men" who censor their feedback? Most importantly, have they achieved something impressive that you wish to emulate, or do they lead lives you want to avoid at all costs?

Life has enough challenges without us making things harder on ourselves. If you're trying to achieve success in a bad environment, it's like trying to drive with the emergency break on. You owe it to yourself to maximize your advantages. If you want to "make it" in some capacity, you need to shed the dead weight. If those around you are negative, discouraging, or holding you back, you need to find another room. Seek out the type of people who have accomplished what you want to accomplish or, at the very least, who remind you of what is possible.

I always aim to be the least capable person in the room. If you're a leader, bring on people who are better than you. If you're learning, seek out the best in your field. Ask questions, listen, observe. Put yourself in situations where you aren't comfortable, where you need to rise to the occasion. If you alter your environment, you'll be amazed at what you can achieve.


Hit List

The most interesting things I've encountered this week:

What I'm watching: "You Hold the Pen" on Instagram

Justin Su'a shared this Instagram post which is an excerpt from a longer podcast (linked below). The message is powerful: we often hold on to stories from our past and use those stories to dictate our future. The most important thing to realize is that you hold the pen, and can write your future however you want. Much like finding new environments, we must shed old stories if we want to be successful.

What I'm listening to: "Turning Your Suffering Into Growth" on the Bare Performance Podcast

This is the full podcast episode that the Instagram excerpt above is from. If you have a bit more time and want to listen to the whole thing, the juice is worth the squeeze.

Quote of the week:

"People have a hard time letting go of their suffering. Out of a fear of the unknown, they prefer suffering that is familiar." - Thich Nhat Hanh

Tip of the week:

One of my other favorite quotes is from Tim Ferris, who says that, "The level of success we achieve in life is directly proportional to the number of uncomfortable conversations we're willing to have."

Finding mentors and upgrading your environment is not as hard as you think, the thing holding us back is often our unwillingness to reach out. People love to teach and help others, most are just afraid to ask.

Send some cold emails or DM's this week; keep it short and sweet, be specific in what you respect and admire about the person, and see if you get any responses.


That will do it for this week!

If you haven't downloaded your free copy yet, I've distilled all my tips and tricks for learning and retaining information here: Trainedwright Learning Guide.pdf

Lastly, as always, if you found any value in this week's newsletter, please share it with just one person who might like it!


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