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Justin Wright

Weekly Recap - Week of 12.6.21

published6 months ago
4 min read

Happy Monday!

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This week, the subject of discussion is reinvention and how best to change oneself when your interests shift.

As a brief disclaimer: any links for items, books, etc. that are available for purchase are done through an affiliate program. This means that I get paid a small pittance of money for everything you buy using my links. I don't recommend things I haven't read/used, so using these links helps me out and gets you great products!


The Art of Reinvention

Our favorite person from last week's newsletter, Naval, was once on Joe Rogan's podcast in a phenomenal episode that I link below. Out of the many topics discussed, there was one thing in particular that resonated with me: reinventing oneself is often a fear-ridden and arduous concept, but one that pays dividends if done well.

Think back to when you were a child and you were inevitably asked the all-important question: "What do you want to be when you grow up?" All of our answers likely varied, but they were probably somewhere on the spectrum of astronaut to superhero. When we are young and our viewpoints are not tainted by life or the passage of time, we dream big and think of possibilities instead of limitations.

Somewhere along the way we grow older, the world extinguishes our flame, and we focus on what is practical instead of what excites us. But what if you could find that excitement again? What if you leveraged the strengths you have developed in life to dive headfirst into a new and interesting career? What if you fully embraced your curiosity and focused on "what if" instead of watching others with envy who have done that very thing?

The fact is you can reinvent yourself at any point, whenever you choose. It is by no means easy, but it can be done. If the reward at the end of the tunnel is so apparent (happiness, satisfaction, success, intrigue), then what keeps us from taking that chance? Like many things, reinvention requires stepping far outside of our comfort zone. It requires facing potential failure, it requires uprooting the life you have built, and the routine you enjoy, in favor of venturing into uncharted territory.

Most people climb the proverbial ladder only to realize that the peak they wanted to reach is atop a different ladder, on a different mountain. The climb back down is painful, the journey to the other destination is long, and we have already spent so much time and effort getting to where we are. That's the paradox: if you don't change direction as soon as you become unsatisfied and unhappy, then every day that goes by reduces your chances of ever making that change.

Don't ever be afraid of the time it will take to accomplish something. The beauty of time is that it passes by whether you want it to or not. I'd rather bet on myself and take a chance at reaching the right mountaintop, even if it means uprooting who I am and embracing radical change. Why put off until tomorrow, the new life that you can build for yourself today?

Life is too short for bad relationships, bad careers, and boring days. Love your life or change it.


Hit List

The most interesting things I've read, heard, or encountered this week:

The podcast mentioned above: Naval on the Joe Rogan Experience (Spotify, YouTube, and episode notes)

This is another deep dive into such paradoxes as the meaning of life, the cost and benefit of reinventing oneself, and how to attain true happiness. There are many gurus out there, but few who have walked the walk and are worth listening to like Naval.

Principles, the remix: Principles for Dealing with the Changing World Order by Ray Dalio

Ray Dalio's original tome, Principles of Life and Work, is one of my most recommended reads. Dalio is the founder of Bridgewater Associates, arguably the most successful hedge fund in the world. His ability to relay critical information, boiled down to digestible principles, has me excited to tackle his latest installment.

What I'm watching: Coaching with a Growth Mindset by Simon Sinek (YouTube)

Simon Sinek is one of the most effective leadership coaches around, gaining fame and notoriety with his book Start with Why. Having a growth mindset is critical when it comes to self-improvement, and it becomes a crucial part of coaching teams. It's easy to get lost down the rabbit hole with Sinek's videos, as he is captivating, motivating, and highly intelligent.

Mindset and mental health: Why the Startup Ecosystem is Ruining Founders' Mental Health by Trevor Nichols

This article is an interesting analysis of the mental health struggles of many entrepreneurs and startup founders in the modern age. With so many people branching out and starting their own businesses, venturing into new careers, or pursuing new opportunities, the conversation around mental health becomes even more critical.

Art in the COVID era: Art Basel Miami Beach: Highlights From Miami Art Week 2021 in Town & Country

In the first in-person Art Basel event of the COVID era, Miami Beach was home to countless artists, Virgil Abloh's final show, and a wave of digital NFT collectors. This article gives a good overview for anyone else who may have FOMO at missing out on an event that bridges the gap between culture, society, and the night life Miami is famous for.


That will do it for this week! Please let me know what you liked, didn't like, and what you want to see more of. Do you want it to be longer, shorter? Do you want specific topics covered more? Less? Have a wonderful week, and remember to please forward this to your friends -- helping get the word out and get more eyes on this newsletter is hugely helpful and greatly appreciated!


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